Monthly Archives: March 2014

Goodreads Tops 100K Authors

Goodreads, one of the top reader review sites, now has over 100,000 authors in their author program. Authors who join their program create their own author page, which enhances readers’ ability to discover their fiction and nonfiction books. Even if your work is out of print, if it’s available as a used book in hard copy, make sure you join their author ranks today!

Book Publisher Info

Reader’s Digest Children’s Publishing has changed its name to Studio Fun International. The change reflects the evolving direction toward reaching new audiences and diversifying their product line.

They’re still looking for innovative, fun projects, so check out their submissions guidelines to see if your juvenile project fits the bill.

Norway’s Free Books Pay Authors

Norway has placed over 135,000 books online for free.

The books cannot be downloaded but they can be read in their entirety online. The website is only accessible by citizens of that country, and every book on the site offers payments to publishers and authors.

The project is intended to help boost print sales for books that were published before 2000. The country feels that titles need to be given more exposure over a longer timeframe than is usually allowed by publishers.

This experiment hits all the right notes: authors and publishers are paid for their work, readers get to sample an author’s work without worrying they won’t like the book, and readers are then driven to buy the print book (and more recent ones from the same author), which further supports publishers, authors, and of course bookstores.

Put Your Writing First

On a typical day, I work on my own novels and novellas, ghostwrite or revise a business book or novel for a client, edit a memoir or collection of essays for a client, write back cover copy and query letters, research publishing trends, and perform administrative tasks like answering email and filing.

Often fellow authors ask me how I get everything done…but most often they ask how I keep my own novels on track considering that I’m basically working three jobs (writing novels, writing/editing clients’ books, and marketing my own work and the works of clients).

My answer is simple: Do the most important work first. That means I write my own books for the first hour of every day.

The rest of the morning is dedicated to high-level client projects (ghostwriting, rewriting, and editing, all of which require a fresh mind and a sharp focus).

After lunch, I research and market.

By the end of the day, I can clean up all the administrative items like filing that don’t require a lot of mental acuity.

What is your most important task? Put it first!

S&S has International Appeal

Simon & Schuster’s president and CEO Carolyn Reidy said the company’s top growth is coming from international sales. Foreign markets are hungry for American books of all types.
To take advantage of this trend, submit to S&S. If you have any works self-published, make sure you’re offering them on digital platforms that have a presence in foreign countries. You don’t have to have a translation; it’s possible to make sales in English-speaking countries as well as India, Scandinavia, and other areas where English is spoken widely as a second language.

Indie Distribution

One of the biggest issues facing self-published authors is distribution. IRIS is a new service from IndieReader that helps resolve this problem.

The service gets the books onto the shelves of indie brick-and-mortar stores. In tandem with other marketing efforts, this might be a big step forward for authors of every genre.