Category Archives: Submissions

New Crime Imprint

Crime novelists Lee Goldberg and Joel Goldman have launched Brash Books with a debut list of 30 titles by award-winning crime novelists. Brash’s books are available through an exclusive partnership with Amazon that offers special marketing opportunities.

They focus entirely on award-winning novels. If you have received an award for an unpublished manuscript, give this imprint a try.

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Unique New Sci-Fi/Fantasy Publisher

Agent Steve Laube took over Marcher Lord Press and renamed it Enclave. Enclave Publishing will focus on science fiction and fantasy with a Christian worldview. This fall, they will release five books. “Fiction continues to be a place where creativity and variety have endless capacity, in all genres,” Laube notes.

Is New Adult Only YA + Sex?

New Adult became an official category in 2013 when it received its own Book Industry Standards and Communications Code. The genre is generally considered to be stories that feature primarily college-aged heroines learning to deal with life in their early twenties…with a special emphasis on romance and sex.

While I agree that this category targets primarily female readers between 18 and 25, the YA + Sex idea is too restrictive. Putting aside the idea that sex is usually tied to some emotional response (whether the characters admit it or not), NA is much more than YA + Sex.

Just as YA broke boundaries by working with content that reflected the real coming-of-age struggles of teenagers approaching adulthood, NA can have the same impact. Publishers like Atria went from producing zero NA titles in 2012 to its current goal of releasing 15-20 each year. As the category finds its readers and more publishers move into the arena, NA stories will expand to encompass much more than teen angst plus sex.

Anytime there is a new movement like this in publishing, it’s important to be part of the first wave. Yes, your entry into publishing will be more difficult because publishers (and booksellers) right now are not sure where the category might go. So show them! Send out your unique NA manuscript. Be the first, and reap the rewards by launching your career by leading the way.

 

New Historical Book Imprint

Flatiron Books is Macmillion’s new historical book imprint. Their first list of seven titles will be released this winter. Once Flatiron Books is up to full speed, it’ll publish five to six books every month. The seek distinctive ideas from unique voices.

Have a nonfiction project that’s perfect for them? Submit your sample chapters and book proposal right away! Let me know if I can help you. I’m always available.

12 New YA Imprints

Here’s a list of YA publishers that have launched recently (within about the last 5 years).

Akashic/Black Sheep Books wants stories with engaging, realistic, and diverse characters that young adults (and adults, the critical second audience for YA stories) can relate to.

Amazon/Skyscape seeks engaging stories for teens and adult crossover readers from diverse genres including contemporary, fantasy, and romance.

Capstone/Switch looks for a  wide variety of genres and formats including graphic novels, westerns, romance, illustrated memoir, historical fiction, realistic fiction, science fiction and nonfiction, including how-to.

Carolrhoda Lab wants distinctive, provocative, boundary-pushing fiction for teens.

ChiTeen seeks dark, well-written genre fiction that includes science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, and horror; stories that don’t necessarily have a happy ending.

F&W/Merit Press looks for a Millennial version of classic YA novels: deeply emotional stories about ordinary kids caught in extraordinary circumstances, coming of age in a complex contemporary world.

Harlequin Teen wants commercial YA fiction of all genres.

Month9Books seeks speculative fiction where nothing is as it seems.

Poisoned Pen Press/Poisoned Pencil looks for edgy mysteries and complex stories that capture “the vibrant teen cocktail of superior wisdom, immediate need, and sometimes hidden honesty.”

Soho Teen looks for mysteries and thrillers.

Sourcebooks Fire wants innovative storytelling in all genres in authentic teen voices.

Triangle Square Editions/Seven Stories Press looks for works that combine social justice and good storytelling. Tagline: “Telling personal stories of courage and commitment.”

Zondervan/Blink likes storytelling that inspires, enriches, and uplifts.

Advances for Children’s Book and Juvenile Authors #getpublished #pubtip

So often, I am asked what kind of an advance an author might expect.

Really, this is a question for which even your literary agent won’t dare to hazard a guess. The reason is because advances can vary so wildly depending on a host of factors outside their control…and even the control of the acquisitions editor.

However, there are some ranges that can be taken as averages. And the averages are different depending on the type of manuscript you’re offering.

So today, I’ll tell you some averages for children’s and juvenile authors. Over the next several days, we’ll look at other types of books from YA through adult fiction and adult nonfiction. The rates given here are for first books from authors who have not yet published with a traditional house.

A children’s picture book, which in final print form has 32 pages with an illustration on every page/for every two-page spread, will garner an advance of $8,000-$12,000. The author splits this with the illustrator, and the illustrator usually receives a larger portion of that advance. Royalty rates are also split, so the author will receive a 3.5%-6% royalty rate.

Easy readers, which are about the same length as the longest (atypical) picture book, generate an average advance of $5,000 to $8,000. Since neither the advance nor the royalty rate of 7-10% are split with the illustrator, they go fully to the author’s share.

Middle grade books, also called chapter books, will range higher on average. Any real range can’t be nailed down in part because the middle grade books parse down into so many categories, grade levels, and whether they are intended for academic or mainstream audiences. Generally, however, a range for the advance might fall between $6,000 and $20,000 depending on whether the author has other publication credits for different age groups, whether the work is a series, and other factors.

Young adult will be considered in the next blog post.

Positive Trend for Christian Authors

At the BEA this year, a panel looked at Christian titles. They agreed that nowadays, the obstacles that used to be present are far less daunting.

It used to be that Christian titles were primarily distributed through the CBA, the Christian Booksellers Association. Now, however, Christianity has gone mainstream. Folks who don’t attend church regularly still want guidance, and they turn to books for that. The demand is growing steadily and sales are strong. They’re so good, in fact, that Christian titles are often now distributed through the ABA, the American Booksellers Association, which handles nearly all topics and categories.

If you’re working with a Christian title for adults, young adults or juvenile readers, let’s talk about your pitch today!