Tag Archives: literature

Discount Sale on Urban/Dystopian Fantasy Sparks Price War Between Amazon and Google

So, like many folks, my novels occasionally go on sale. Right now, Reparation’s ebook is on sale until October 3 (links at bottom of this post). Usually, this is where I would give you the book’s slugline, which is:

ReparationEbookHaruki Murakami’s 1Q84 meets Mark Helprin’s Winter’s Tale as a man battles sinister forces associated with a Native American peyote cult.

I would also inform you that the work has won a national award, and that the usual ebook price is $9.99.

Now, here’s where things get interesting.

The sale price was made available through two ebook channels: Amazon and Google Play. Both provide worldwide distribution, and both offer fast and easy access for readers.

Usually the buying choice is entirely about habits and preferred methods. Some folks like to run all their purchases through Amazon. Others prefer Google, while another set don’t display any particular loyalty.

Today, with Google’s continual efforts to pry their way further into the book market, we see one clear step they are taking to gain more share: beat Amazon’s price. Importantly, this will be done without dropping the revenue earned by the book. So, everyone wins…especially the ecosystem that provides readers with more choice through more distribution channels.

Where will you buy today? Let me know, and we’ll see if the sales figures back you up!

Now, finally, about Reparation!

A beautifully written supernatural story—the work of a master craftsman.”
“Endlessly compelling. A fascinating fusion of forms.”

“Whatever is dangerous, let me do it…I am supposed to die.”

When Aidan Little Boy leaves his ailing mother’s side to visit his sister on a peyote church property in South Dakota, he encounters a religious cult run by an apparently superhuman leader. Suddenly his nondescript life becomes tangled in a world that has grown disturbing and strange.

In a series of remarkable events, the ancient beings of Native American folktales are manipulated by people with strong connections to the parallel world of spirits. Soon Aidan uncovers evidence that his sister and the rapidly growing congregation are in danger. He must understand these unknown powerful forces before the Reparation, a ceremony that will slaughter thousands of innocents.

This complex and surreal novel merges folktales, history, and contemporary lifestyles with magical realism in a hypnotically addictive original tale.

Honorable Mention, Writer’s Digest 2016 Ebook Award

Currently discounted on Amazon and Google Play. At the time of this post, Google is beating Amazon’s price by $0.48!

Grab it now, because these deep discounts won’t last long!

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Book Review: Those Rosy Hours at Mazandaran by Marion Grace Woolley #reviews #literature

Available from Ghostwoods Books February 2015
A ravishingly written book that burns ferociously long after the last page has been turned.
This book blew. Me. Away. I haven’t laid hands on something this beautiful, this sensuously dark and attractive, since Patrick Susskind’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer.
Set in an 1850s that feels as modern and yet as fable-like as any fantasy or fairytale, the story follows Afsar, a young woman who is the daughter of the Shah. In the Shah’s country palace, time is something that needs to be filled. The entire royal family fills it with sadistic repasts, feasts of blood that torture and murder the sworn enemies of state. The rosy hours of the title refer to a particularly horrific days-long torment of a group of rebels, a blood-soaked orgy of violence and cruelty.
Growing up in such an environment and under the thumb of a father who is not actually her father, Afsar yearns for something more. What that something is, she isn’t sure. When a circus is brought to the palace grounds, she is captivated by a magician who wears a mask to hide his facial deformity. After she murders his friend, a girl she takes as a rival for his affections, the magician trains her in the art of murder.
It is something she takes to well. At first there is hesitation and even repulsion that she fights to quell. Underneath she finds that something she has been missing: the feeling of power, a strength that is denied her under the dictates of her brother-father, palace life, and a culture that oppresses women.
She finds freedom of a sort…a gashed and bleeding sort that wounds both her and her victims. She creates justice for other women who are wounded while also oppressing those around her—the poor, the weak, other women. She is as deformed internally as her paramour is externally.
This book grips readers in a way that defies description. While you walk with Afsar, you hold her hand as much as you are held in her thrall. You feel repulsion and yet something more, compassion and pity. This is a dark tale, yes, but one with the complexity that places it immediately in the ranks of classic literature that will live far longer than any of us reading this now. Clearly one for the ages.
An enthusiastic 5 stars!
Check back on Wednesday for an interview with this author.